Eligibility by Disease

Eligibility by Disease

Although hospice care is becoming more common, many people are still uninformed of its full range of benefits and services. Because hospice is often misunderstood, many patients who can benefit from hospice care are never enrolled, and care is often given too late.

Please use the resources below to gain a better understanding of hospice eligibility by disease state.

General Admission Hospice Care

There are numerous other life-limiting illnesses that warrant skilled hospice care and treatment. Website to learn more about Hospice Eligibility Reference Guidelines.

Hospice Care for Cancer

Hospice care has been shown to improve symptom management, quality of life and satisfaction with care at the end of life. Yet most people with advanced cancer who are likely to benefit from this type of care do not utilize hospice services, and those who do typically begin hospice care too close to the time of death to receive maximum benefits.

Website to learn more about Hospice Eligibility Reference Guidelines

Hospice Care for Dementia

As many as 5.3 million people are living with Alzheimer’s Disease. In fact, in 2005, Alzheimer’s was listed as the cause of death for over 71,696 people in America. But according to one study, less than 30% of these patients received hospice care.  Hospice care benefits dementia patients in numerous ways including less pain, fewer psychiatric symptoms and fewer unmet needs.

Website to learn more about Hospice Eligibility Reference Guidelines

Hospice Care for Heart Disease

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in men and women in America.4 Many experience pain, dyspnea, depression and frequent hospital readmission. The benefits of hospice care for heart disease patients include fewer inpatient hospital days, fewer emergency room visits and longer life expectancy.

Website to learn more about Hospice Eligibility Reference Guidelines

Hospice Care for Lung Disease

During 2000, COPD was responsible for 8 million physician office and hospital outpatient visits, 1.5 million emergency department visits, 726,000 hospitalizations and 119,000 deaths. Hospice offers a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach to relieving the distress of patients suffering from advanced lung disease and can support their families both before and after the patient dies. Dyspnea and anxiety, two of the most distressing symptoms these patients can experience, can often be improved by the 24-hour support that hospice offers.

Website to learn more about Hospice Eligibility Reference Guidelines

Hospice Care for Liver Disease

End-Stage Liver Disease (ESLD) patients frequently develop ascites, irreversible coagulopathy, encephalopathy and spur-cell anemia. Hospice has become a standard of care for patients with life-threatening illnesses, including ESLD. Hospice care has been shown to improve symptom-management and quality of life for patients at the end of life.

Website to learn more about Hospice Eligibility Reference Guidelines

Hospice Care for Kidney Disease

End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients frequently report overwhelming burden associated with their symptoms. These symptoms include: poor mobility, weakness, anorexia, itching, and pain. The Renal Physicians Association and the American Society of Nephrology recognize that hospice physicians and nurses have expertise in pain and symptom management and advance care planning. Due to the team approach that is utilized, ESRD patients’ and families’ physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs are well addressed with hospice care.

Website to learn more about Hospice Eligibility Reference Guidelines

Citations

  • American Cancer Society News Stories, (May 13, 2003)
  • Bekelman, D.B.; Black, B.S.; Shore, A.D.; Kasper, J.D.; Rabins, P.V. (2005). Hospice care in a cohort of elders with dementia and mild cognitive impairment. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 30 (3), 208-214.
  • Mitchell, S.L.; Kiely, D.K.; Miller, S.C.; Connor, S.R.; Spence, C.; Teno, J.M. (2007). Hospice care for patients with dementia. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 34 (1), 7-16.
  • CDC, 2010
  • Krumholz, H.M.; Parent, E.M.; Nora, M.S.; et. al. (1997). Readmission after hospitalization for congestive heart failure among Medicare beneficiaries. Archives of Internal Medicine, 157, 99-104.
  • Connor, S.R.; Pyenson, B.; Fitch, K; Spence, C.; and Iwasaki, K. (2007). Comparing hospice and nonhospice patient survival among patients who die within a three-year window. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 33 (3), 238-246.
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2010
  • Abrahm, J.L.; Hansen-Flaschen, J. (2002). Hospice care for patients with advanced lung disease. CHEST, 121, 220-229.
  • McCarth, EP; Burns, RB; Ngo-Metzger, O; Davis, RB; Phillips, RS. (2003). Hospice use among Medicare Managed Care and Fee-for Service patients dying with cancer. The Journal of the American Medical Association, 289, 2238-2245.
  • Murphy, EL; Murtagh, FEM; Carey, I; Sheerin, NS. (2009). Understanding symptoms in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease managed without dialysis: Use of a short patient-completed assessment tool. Nephron Clinical Practice, 111, c74-80.
  • Moss, A.H. (2005). Improving end-of-life care for dialysis patients. American Journal of Kidney Diseases, 45, 209-212.